15 Responses to Predictive Coding Based Legal Methods for Search and Review

  1. Terry Dexter says:

    Mr. Losey,

    I notice the inclusion of “7±2″ in your graphic. I’m curious if this number refers back to a 1950’s cognitive psychology theory that “a given individual can handle 7±2 ‘chunks’ of information at a time”?

    I have seen this used in software complexity theory (e.g., Halstead’s Software Science monograph) and in some user interface design. While the ‘chunk’ theory has a weak foundation, it appears to hold true.

    Your throughts?

  2. Peter Tees says:

    Terry – yes that’s what he’s referring to. Mr Losey refers to this in several earlier blog posts (I recall he thinks the numbers are more like 5 ± 2 but the point is fairly moot).
    If you haven’t read the earlier posts, comb back through them. I’m an observer rather than practitioner but I have a feeling that in <3 years time this will fall into place along the lines which Mr Losey advocates if for no other reasons tha (a) things HAVE to change and (b) TAR or whatever-you-want-to-call-it seems the best bet just now.

  3. Jeffrey Schilling says:

    While experienced attorneys are needed at every step of the EDRM process, it appears that the profession is hesitant regarding investing in the cultivation of this talent. The work of e-Discovery attorneys, review attorneys in particular, continues to provide little to no access to stable employment, (never mind partnership). This creates a tension between the need for sophisticated review attorneys, well practiced in the art of iterative search and review, and the value, or the lack thereof, placed on those skills by the profession.

    How long before this tension cause the profession to collapse due to a fundamental mismatch between what it values and the clients’ need for skilled management of its information to meet the legal demands they face?

  4. Ralph Losey says:

    I have long thoght that the marketplace would force a change and now, finally, it looks like it is starting to happen. Hang in there and keep on improving your skills. Constant education is now required of all true professionals.

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  7. [...] overview of Predictive Coding, I suggest that you read a March 25, 2012 Blog post titled, “Predictive Coding Based Legal Methods for Search and Review“, Ralph Losey does an excellent job of discussing the basic technical mechanics and some of [...]

  8. [...] call this the Unicorn search problem, which I have previously described without the math in Predictive Coding Based Legal Methods for Search and Review. It happens frequently in the law where you are asked to produce a document that does not exist. In [...]

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  13. […] call this the Unicorn search problem, which I have previously described in Predictive Coding Based Legal Methods for Search and Review. Of course, this requires proof of excellent search, another challenge that does not intimidate me […]

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