New Homework Added to the TAR Course and a New Video Added to AI-Ethics

September 3, 2017

We have added a homework assignment to Class Sixteen of the TAR Course. This is the next to last class in the course. Here we cover the eighth step of our eight-step routine, Phased Production. I share the full homework assignment below for those not yet familiar with our instructional methods, especially our take on homework. Learning is or should be a life-long process.

But before we get to that I want to share the new video added to the AI-Ethics.com web at the end of the Intro/Mission page. Here I articulate the opinion of many in the AI world that an interdisciplinary team approach is necessary for the creation of ethical codes to regulate artificial intelligence. This team approach has worked well for electronic discovery and Losey is convinced it will work for AI Law as well. AI Ethics is one of the most important issues facing humanity today. It is way too important for lawyers and government regulators alone. It is also way too important to leave to AI coders and professors to improvise on their own. We have to engage in true dialogue and collaborate.

______

Now back to the more mundane world of homework and learning the Team’s latest process for the application of machine learning to find evidence for trial. Here is the new homework assignment for Class Sixteen of the TAR Course.

____

Go on to the Seventeenth and last class, or pause to do this suggested “homework” assignment for further study and analysis.

SUPPLEMENTAL READING: It is important to have a good understanding of privilege and work-product protection. The basic U.S. Supreme Court case in this area is Hickman v. Taylor, 329 US 495 (1947). Another key case to know is Upjohn Co., v. U.S. 449 U.S. 383 (1981).  For an authoritative digest of case law on the subject with an e-discovery perspective, download and study The Sedona Conference Commentary on Protection of Privileged ESI 2015.pdf (Dec. 2015).

EXERCISES: Study Judge Andrew Peck’s form 502(d) order.  You can find it here. His form order started off as just two sentences, but he later added a third sentence at the end:

The production of privileged or work-product protected documents, electronically stored information (“ESI”) or information, whether inadvertent or otherwise, is not a waiver of the privilege or protection from discovery in this case or in any other federal or state proceeding. This Order shall be interpreted to provide the maximum protection allowed by Federal Rule of Evidence 502(d).
Nothing contained herein is intended to or shall serve to limit a party’s right to conduct a review of documents, ESI or information (including metadata) for relevance, responsiveness and/or segregation of privileged and/or protected information before production.

Do you know the purpose of this additional sentence? Why might someone oppose a 502(d) Order? What does that tell you about them? What does that tell the judge about them? My law firm has been opposed a few times, but we have never failed. Well, there was that one time, where both sides agreed, and the judge would not enter the stipulated order, saying it was not necessary, that he would anyway provide such protection. So, mission accomplished anyway.

Do you think it is overly hyper for us to recommend that a 502(d) Order be entered in every case where there is ESI review and production? Think that some cases are too small and too easy to bother with that? That it is o.k. to just have a claw-back agreement? Well take a look at this opinion and you may well change your mind. Irth Solutions, LLC v. Windstream Communications, LLC, (S.D. Ohio, E Div., 8/2/17). Do you think this was a fair decision? What do you think about the partner putting all of the blame on the senior associate (seven-year) for the mistaken production of privileged ESI? What do you think of the senior associate who in turn blamed the junior associate (two-year)? The opinion does not state who signed the Rule 26(g) response to the request to produce. Do you think that should matter? By the way, having been a partner in a law firm since at least 1984, I think this kind of blame-game behavior was reprehensible!

Students are invited to leave a public comment below. Insights that might help other students are especially welcome. Let’s collaborate!

 




%d bloggers like this: