True Confession: I Hacked a Website this Weekend

August 20, 2017

Hacked a website this weekend, my own. AI-Ethics.com. As I’m sure most of you know by now, that means I made a new website. Hope you will come by and check it out. It was made pretty fast, and will no doubt need constant improvements going forward, but I like it. It has a whole new coding style. As usual, it is free and open to one and all. My point was to build something of social value. You be the judge as to whether I succeeded at that.

A careful reader will notice it is not really totally new, as most of the content has been published here before, but the website itself is brand new. There are many new words in it too. Below is a screen shot of part of the Home Page. Just click and the new AI-Ethics.com will be sent to your screen.

You be the judge as to how bold a move this new project is. I went with a whole new design and also created several new graphics for it. Please note the multiple invitations in the website for volunteers to help me with the ethics work going forward. (Do not need help with the actual code work.) I personally think Ray Kurzweil may be right. We need to follow the Hacker Way and move fast because the next HAL 9000 could be just around the corner. According to Craig Ball he already owns a toaster smarter than the current POTUS.

 

 


How the Hacker Way Guided Me to e-Discovery, then AI Ethics

August 13, 2017

This new ten minute video on Hacker Way and Legal Practice Management was added to my Hacker Way and AI-Ethics pages this week. It explains how one led to another. It also provides more insight into why I think the major problems of e-discovery have now been solved, with a shout-out to all e-discovery vendors and the team approach of lawyers working with them. This interdisciplinary team approach is how we overcame e-discovery challenges and, if my theory is correct, will also allow us to meet the regulatory challenges surrounding artificial intelligence. Hopefully my video disclosures here will provide useful insights into how the Hacker Way management credo used by most high-tech companies can also be followed by lawyers.

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E-DISCOVERY IS OVER: The big problems of e-discovery have now all been solved. Crises Averted. The Law now has bigger fish to fry.

July 30, 2017

Congratulations!

We did it. We survived the technology tsunami. The time of great danger to Law and Justice from  e-Discovery challenges is now over. Whew! A toast of congratulations to one and all.

From here on it is just a matter of tweaking the principles and procedures that we have already created, plus never-ending education, a good thing, and politics, not good, but inevitable. The team approach of lawyers and engineers (vendors) working together has been proven effective, so have the new Rules and case law, and so too have the latest methods of legal search and document review.

I realize that many will be tempted to compare my view to that of a famous physicist in 1894 who declared:

There is nothing new to be discovered in physics now. All that remains is more and more precise measurement.

Lord Kelvin (1824-1907)

Then along came Einstein. Many attribute this humorously mistaken assertion to Lord Kelvin aka William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin. According to Quora, scholarship shows that it was probably said by the American physicist, Albert Michelson, behind the famous Michelson–Morley experiment on the speed of light.

Still, even mindful of the dangers of boasting, I still think that most of the really tough problems in electronic discovery have now been solved.

The time of great unknowns in e-discovery are past. The rules, principles, case law, procedures, software, methods, quality controls vendor services are now well-developed. All that remains is more and more precise measurement.

The Wild West days are way gone. Certainly new problems will arise and experiments will continue, but they will not be on the same level or intensity as before. They will be minor problems. They will likely be very similar to issues we have already addressed, just with exponential magnification or new twist and turns typical of the common law.

This is a tremendous accomplishment. The crises we all saw coming around the corner at the turn of the century has been averted. Remember how the entire legal profession was abuzz in emergency mode in 2005 because of the greats dangers and burdens of e-discovery?  Yes, thanks to the hard work and creativity of many people, the big problems have now been solved, especially the biggest problem of them all, finding the needles of relevance in cosmic-sized haystacks of irrelevant noise. TARcourse.com. We now know what is required to do e-discovery correctly. EDBP.com. We have the software and attorney methods needed to find the relevant evidence we need, no matter what the volume of information we are dealing with.

We have invented, implemented and perfected procedures than can be enhanced and altered as needed to accommodate the ever growing complexity and exponential growth. We expect that. There is no data too big to handle. If fact, the more data we have, the better our active machine learning systems get, like, for instance, predictive coding. What an incredible difference from the world we faced in e-discovery just five years ago.

This success was a team effort by thousands of people around the world, including a small core group who devoted their professional lives to solving these problems. My readers have been a part of this and you can pat yourself on the back too. The paradigm shift has been made. Maybe it was the Sedona vortexes?

Now that the tough parts of e-discovery are over, the rest of the ride is downhill. Some of my readers have already moved on. I will not retire, not just yet. I will keep up the work of e-discovery, even as I watch it transition to just teaching and politics. These activities have there own unique challenges too, even if they are not really all that impact-full in the big scheme of things. Plus, I find politics disgusting. You will see tons of dirty pool in our field soon. I cannot talk about it now. We have some renegades with authority who never solved an e-discovery problem in their life. Posers with power.

But what is that new turbulence I hear in the distance? It is a bizarre new sound with vibrations never experienced before. It lies far outside of well trodden paths and sounds both discordant and harmonious, sirens-like at the same time. It lies on the outer, cutting edges of law, science and technology. It sounds like a new, more profound Technology and Law challenge has emerged. It is the splashing of bigger fish to fry. I am hearing the eerie smarts sounds of AI. A music of both exuberance and fear, utopia or extinction.

The Biggest Challenge Today is the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence.

Following my own advice of the Hacker Way approach I have given this considerable thought lately. I have found an area that has far more serious challenges and dangers than e-discovery – the challenges of AI Ethics.

I think that my past hacks, my past experiences with law and technology, have prepared me to step-up to this last, really big hack, the creation of a code of ethics for AI. A code that will save humanity from a litany of possible ills arising out of AI’s inevitable leap to super-intelligence.  I have come to see that my work in the new area of AI Ethics could have a far greater impact than my current work with active machine learning and the discovery of evidence in legal proceedings. AI Ethics is the biggest problem that I see right now where I have some hand-on skills to contribute. AI Ethics is concerned with artificial intelligence, both special and general, and the need for ethical guidelines, including best practices, principles, laws and regulations.

This new direction has led to my latest hack, AI-Ethics.com. Here you will find 3,866 words, many of them quotes; 19 graphics, including a photo of Richard Braman; and 9 videos with several hours worth of content. You will find quotes and videos on AI Ethics from the top minds in the world, including:

  • Steven Hawking
  • Elon Musk
  • Bill Gates
  • Ray Kurzweil
  • Mark Zuckerberg
  • Sam Harris
  • Nick Bostrom
  • Oren Etzioni
  • 2017 Asilomar conference
  • Sam Altman
  • Susumu Hirano
  • Wendell Wallach

Please come visit at AI-Ethics.com. The next big thing. Lawyers are needed, as the web explains. I look forward to any recommendations you may have.

I have done the basic research for AI Ethics, at least the beginning big-picture research of the subject. The AI-Ethics.com website shares the information that had biggest impact for me personally. The web I hacked together also provides numerous links to resources where you can continue and customize your study.

I have been continuously improving the content since this started just over a week ago. This will continue as my study continues.

As you will see, a proposal has already emerged to have an International Conference in Florida on AI Ethics as early as 2018. We would assemble some of the top experts and concerned citizens from all walks of life. I hope especially to get Elon Musk to attend and will time the event to correspond with one of SpaceX’es many launches here. My vision for the conference is to facilitate dialogue with high-tech variations appropriate for the AI environment.

The Singularity of superintelligent AIs may come soon. We may live long enough to see it. When it does, we want a positive future to emerge, not a dystopia. Taking action now on AI ethics can help a positive future come to pass.

Here is one of many great videos on the subject of AI in general. This technology is really interesting. Kevin Kelly, the co-founder of Wired, does a good job of laying out some of its characteristics. Kelly takes an old-school approach and does not speak about superintelligence in an exponential sense.

 


Team’s TAR Course has been Updated and Expanded

May 21, 2017

I was in Manhattan at the Marriott on Times Square this week presenting on advanced TAR with Jim Sullivan. We provided an overview on the Team’s latest methods, Hybrid Multimodal IST Predictive Coding 4.0. Presentations like this allow you to interact with students and refine your approach. It was a good group, as is typical in NYC, of lawyers and litigation support experts.

I left N.Y. on Wednesday night, well before the madman drove his car into Times Square on Thursday. Jim stayed overnight and walked out of Times Square just minutes before this horrible massacre. My condolences to the family of the nineteen year old girl who was killed and the twenty-two other pedestrians who were injured.

When I got home from NYC I condensed our eighty-five minute presentation into a thirty-seven minute video. It now serves as the core video introduction to the e-Discovery Team’s free TAR Course. It is found in the first of the sixteen classes in the Course. I also revised and improved the wording in the Welcome Page of the course and made it a stand alone entry point. To have a little more fun with all of this I also created a new graphic, shown below. It provides a visualization of the core content of the TAR Course. Click on it to see a larger view.

This TAR Course welcome page now has its own written and video content. That material used to be combined with the first class. So the net result is an expansion of the TAR Course from sixteen to seventeen modules. At this point the first eleven classes have “Homework Assignments” at the end with suggested supplemental readings and analytic challenges. We will be adding homework to the last five classes in the next month.

If you have already studied the first class, I urge you to go back and reread and re-view the writings and new three-part video. I also reproduce the same new video below. I call it an overview video, a first tell, but it contains advanced materials and some of my latest thinking.

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Go to the TAR Course.


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