e-Discovery and Poetry on a Rainy Night in Portugal

April 17, 2018

From time to time I like read poetry. Lately it has been the poetry of Billy Collins, a neighbor and famous friend. (He was the Poet Laureate of the United States from 2001 to 2003.) I have been reading his latest book recently, The Rain in Portugal. Billy’s comedic touches balance the heavy parts. Brilliant poet. I selected one poem from this book to write about here, The Five Spot, 1964. It has a couple of obvious e-discovery parallels. It also mentions a musician I had never heard of before, Roland Kirk, who was a genius at musical multi-tasking. Enjoy the poem and videos that follow. There is even a lesson here on e-discovery.

The Five Spot, 1964

There’s always a lesson to be learned
whether in a hotel bar
or over tea in a teahouse,
no matter which way it goes,
for you or against,
what you want to hear or what you don’t.

Seeing Roland Kirk, for example,
with two then three saxophones
in his mouth at once
and a kazoo, no less,
hanging from his neck at the ready.

Even in my youth I saw this
not as a lesson in keeping busy
with one thing or another,
but as a joyous impossible lesson
in how to do it all at once,

pleasing and displeasing yourself
with harmony here and discord there.
But what else did I know
as the waitress lit the candle
on my round table in the dark?
What did I know about anything?

Billy Collins

The famous musician in this poem is Rahsaan Roland Kirk (August 7, 1935[2] – December 5, 1977). Kirk was an American jazz multi-instrumentalist who played tenor saxophone, flute, and many other instruments. He was renowned for his onstage vitality, during which virtuoso improvisation was accompanied by comic banter, political ranting, and, as mentioned, the astounding ability to simultaneously play several musical instruments.

Here is a video of Roland Kirk with his intense multimodal approach to music.

One more Kirk video. What a character.

____

The Law

There are a few statements in Billy Collins’ Five Spot poem that have obvious applications to legal discovery, such as “There’s always a lesson to be learnedno matter which way it goes, for you or against, what you want to hear or what you don’t.” We are all trained to follow the facts, the trails, wherever they may lead, pro or con.

I do not say either pro or con “my case” because it is not. It is my client’s case. Clients pay lawyers for their knowledge, skill and independent advice. Although lawyers like to hear evidence that supports their client’s positions and recollections, after all it makes their job easier, they also want to hear evidence that goes against their client. They want to hear all sides of a story and understand what it means. They look at everything to craft a reasonable story for judge and jury.

Almost all cases have good and bad evidence on both sides. There is usually some merit to each side’s positions. Experienced lawyers look for the truth and present it in the best light favorable for their client. The Rules of Procedure and duties to the court and client require this too.

Bottom line for all e-discovery professionals is that you learn the lessons taught by the parties notes and documents, all of the lessons, good and bad.

The poem calls this a “… joyous impossible lesson in how to do it all at once, pleasing and displeasing yourself with harmony here and discord there.” All lawyers know this place, this joyless lesson of discovering the holes in your client’s case. As far as the “doing it all at once ” phrase, this too is very familiar to any e-discovery professional. If it is done right, at the beginning of a case, the activity is fast and furious. Kind of like a Roland Kirk solo, but without Roland’s exuberance.

Everybody knows that the many tasks of e-discovery must be done quickly and pretty much all at once at the beginning of a case: preservation notices, witness interviews, ESI collection, processing and review. The list goes on and on. Yet, in spite of this knowledge, most everyone still treats e-discovery as if they had bags of time to do it. Which brings me to another Billy Collins poem that I like:

BAGS OF TIME

When the keeper of the inn
where we stayed in the Outer Hebrides
said we had bags of time to catch the ferry,
which we would reach by traversing the causeway
between this island and the one to the north,

I started wondering what a bag of time
might look like and how much one could hold.
Apparently, more than enough time for me
to wonder about such things,
I heard someone shouting from the back of my head.

Then the ferry arrived, silent across the water,
at the Lochmaddy Ferry Terminal,
and I was still thinking about the bags of time
as I inched the car clanging onto the slipway
then down into the hold for the vehicles.

Yet it wasn’t until I stood at the railing
of the upper deck with a view of the harbor
that I decided that a bag of time
should be the same color as the pale blue
hull of the lone sailboat anchored there.

And then we were in motion, drawing back
from the pier and turning toward the sea
as ferries had done for many bags of time,
I gathered from talking to an old deckhand,
who was decked out in a neon yellow safety vest,

and usually on schedule, he added,
unless the weather has something to say about it.

Conclusion

Take time out to relax and let yourself ponder the works of a poet. We have bags of time in our life for that. Poetry is liable to make you a better person and a better lawyer.

I leave you with two videos of poetry readings by Billy Collins, the first at the Obama White House. He is by far my favorite contemporary poet. Look for some of his poems on dogs and cats. They are especially good for any pet lovers like me.

One More Billy Collins video.

 


Document Review and Proportionality – Part Two

March 28, 2018

This is a continuation of a blog that I started last week. Suggest you read Part One before this.

Simplified Six Step Review Plan for Small and Medium Sized Cases or Otherwise Where Predictive Coding is Not Used

Here is the workflow for the simplified six-step plan. The first three steps repeat until you have a viable plan where the costs estimate is proportional under Rule 26(b)(1).

Step One: Multimodal Search

The document review begins with Multimodal Search of the ESI. Multimodal means that all modes of search are used to try to find relevant documents. Multimodal search uses a variety of techniques in an evolving, iterated process. It is never limited to a single search technique, such as keyword. All methods are used as deemed appropriate based upon the data to be reviewed and the software tools available. The basic types of search are shown in the search pyramid.

search_pyramid_revisedIn Step One we use a multimodal approach, but we typically begin with keyword and concept searches. Also, in most projects we will run similarity searches of all kinds to make the review more complete and broaden the reach of the keyword and concept searches. Sometimes we may even use a linear search, expert manual review at the base of the search pyramid. For instance, it might be helpful to see all communications that a key witness had on a certain day. The two-word stand-alone call me email when seen in context can sometimes be invaluable to proving your case.

I do not want to go into too much detail of the types of searches we do in this first step because each vendor’s document review software has different types of searches built it. Still, the basic types of search shown in the pyramid can be found in most software, although AI, active machine learning on top, is still only found in the best.

History of Multimodal Search

Professor Marcia Bates

Multimodal search, wherein a variety of techniques are used in an evolving, iterated process, is new to the legal profession, but not to Information Science. That is the field of scientific study which is, among many other things, concerned with computer search of large volumes of data. Although the e-Discovery Team’s promotion of multimodal search techniques to find evidence only goes back about ten years, Multimodal is a well-established search technique in Information Science. The pioneer professor who first popularized this search method was Marcia J. Bates, and her article, The Design of Browsing and Berrypicking Techniques for the Online Search Interface, 13 Online Info. Rev. 407, 409–11, 414, 418, 421–22 (1989). Professor Bates of UCLA did not use the term multimodal, that is my own small innovation, instead she coined the word “berrypicking” to describe the use of all types of search to find relevant texts. I prefer the term “multimodal” to “berrypicking,” but they are basically the same techniques.

In 2011 Marcia Bates explained in Quora her classic 1989 article and work on berrypicking:

An important thing we learned early on is that successful searching requires what I called “berrypicking.” . . .

Berrypicking involves 1) searching many different places/sources, 2) using different search techniques in different places, and 3) changing your search goal as you go along and learn things along the way. . . .

This may seem fairly obvious when stated this way, but, in fact, many searchers erroneously think they will find everything they want in just one place, and second, many information systems have been designed to permit only one kind of searching, and inhibit the searcher from using the more effective berrypicking technique.

Marcia J. Bates, Online Search and Berrypicking, Quora (Dec. 21, 2011). Professor Bates also introduced the related concept of an evolving search. In 1989 this was a radical idea in information science because it departed from the established orthodox assumption that an information need (relevance) remains the same, unchanged, throughout a search, no matter what the user might learn from the documents in the preliminary retrieved set. The Design of Browsing and Berrypicking Techniques for the Online Search Interface. Professor Bates dismissed this assumption and wrote in her 1989 article:

In real-life searches in manual sources, end users may begin with just one feature of a broader topic, or just one relevant reference, and move through a variety of sources.  Each new piece of information they encounter gives them new ideas and directions to follow and, consequently, a new conception of the query.  At each stage they are not just modifying the search terms used in order to get a better match for a single query.  Rather the query itself (as well as the search terms used) is continually shifting, in part or whole.   This type of search is here called an evolving search.

Furthermore, at each stage, with each different conception of the query, the user may identify useful information and references. In other words, the query is satisfied not by a single final retrieved set, but by a series of selections of individual references and bits of information at each stage of the ever-modifying search. A bit-at-a-time retrieval of this sort is here called berrypicking. This term is used by analogy to picking huckleberries or blueberries in the forest. The berries are scattered on the bushes; they do not come in bunches. One must pick them one at a time. One could do berrypicking of information without  the search need itself changing (evolving), but in this article the attention is given to searches that combine both of these features.

I independently noticed evolving search as a routine phenomena in legal search and only recently found Professor Bates’ prior descriptions. I have written about this often in the field of legal search (although never previously crediting Professor Bates) under the names “concept drift” or “evolving relevance.” See Eg. Concept Drift and Consistency: Two Keys To Document Review Quality – Part Two (e-Discovery Team, 1/24/16). Also see Voorhees, Variations in Relevance Judgments and the Measurement of Retrieval Effectiveness, 36 Info. Processing & Mgmt  697 (2000) at page 714.

SIDE NOTE: The somewhat related term query drift in information science refers to a different phenomena in machine learning. In query drift  the concept of document relevance unintentionally changes from the use of indiscriminate pseudorelevance feedback. Cormack, Buttcher & Clarke, Information Retrieval Implementation and Evaluation of Search Engines (MIT Press 2010) at pg. 277. This can lead to severe negative relevance feedback loops where the AI is trained incorrectly. Not good. If that happens a lot of other bad things can and usually do happen. It must be avoided.

Yes. That means that skilled humans must still play a key role in all aspects of the delivery and production of goods and services, lawyers too.

UCLA Berkeley Professor Bates first wrote about concept shift when using early computer assisted search in the late 1980s. She found that users might execute a query, skim some of the resulting documents, and then learn things which slightly changes their information need. They then refine their query, not only in order to better express their information need, but also because the information need itself has now changed. This was a new concept at the time because under the Classical Model Of Information Retrieval an information need is single and unchanging. Professor Bates illustrated the old Classical Model with the following diagram.

The Classical Model was misguided. All search projects, including the legal search for evidence, are an evolving process where the understanding of the information need progresses, improves, as the information is reviewed. See diagram below for the multimodal berrypicking type approach. Note the importance of human thinking to this approach.

See Cognitive models of information retrieval (Wikipedia). As this Wikipedia article explains:

Bates argues that searches are evolving and occur bit by bit. That is to say, a person constantly changes his or her search terms in response to the results returned from the information retrieval system. Thus, a simple linear model does not capture the nature of information retrieval because the very act of searching causes feedback which causes the user to modify his or her cognitive model of the information being searched for.

Multimodal search assumes that the information need evolves over the course of a document review. It is never just run one search and then review all of the documents found in the search. That linear approach was used in version 1.0 of predictive coding, and is still used by most lawyers today. The dominant model in law today is linear, wherein a negotiated list of keyword is used to run one search. I called this failed method “Go Fish” and a few judges, like Judge Peck, picked up on that name. Losey, R., Adventures in Electronic Discovery (West 2011); Child’s Game of ‘Go Fish’ is a Poor Model for e-Discovery Search; Moore v. Publicis Groupe & MSL Group, 287 F.R.D. 182, 190-91, 2012 WL 607412, at *10 (S.D.N.Y. Feb. 24, 2012) (J. Peck).

The popular, but ineffective Go Fish approach is like the Classical Information Retrieval Model in that only a single list of keywords is used as the query. The keywords are not refined over time as the documents are reviewed. This is a mono-modal process. It is contradicted by our evolving multimodal process, Step One in our Six-Step plan. In the first step we run many, many searches and review some of the results of each search, some of the documents, and then change the searches accordingly.

Step Two: Tests, Sample

Each search run is sampled by quick reviews and its effectiveness evaluated, tested. For instance, did a search of what you expected would be an unusual word turn up far more hits than anticipated? Did the keyword show up in all kinds of documents that had nothing to do with the case? For example, a couple of minutes of review might show that what you thought would be a carefully and rarely used word, Privileged, was in fact part of the standard signature line of one custodian. All his emails had the keyword Privileged on them. The keyword in these circumstances may be a surprise failure, at least as to that one custodian. These kind of unexpected language usages and surprise failures are commonplace, especially with neophyte lawyers.

Sampling here does not mean random sampling, but rather judgmental sampling, just picking a few representative hit documents and reviewing them. Were a fair number of berries found in that new search bush, or not? In our example, assume that your sample review of the documents with “Privileged” showed that the word was only part of one person’s standard signature on every one of their emails. When a new search is run wherein this custodian is excluded, the search results may now test favorably. You may devise other searches that exclude or limit the keyword “Privileged” whenever it is found in a signature.

There are many computer search tools used in a multimodal search method, but the most important tool of all is not algorithmic, but human. The most important search tool is the human ability to think the whole time you are looking for tasty berries. (The all important “T” in Professor Bates’ diagram above.) This means the ability to improvise, to spontaneously respond and react to unexpected circumstances. This mean ad hoc searches that change with time and experience. It is not a linear, set it and forget it, keyword cull-in and read all documents approach. This was true in the early days of automated search with Professor Bates berrypicking work in the late 1980s, and is still true today. Indeed, since the complexity of ESI has expanded a million times since then, our thinking, improvisation and teamwork are now more important than ever.

The goal in Step Two is to identify effective searches. Typically, that means where most of the results are relevant, greater than 50%. Ideally we would like to see roughly 80% relevancy. Alternatively, search hits that are very few in number, and thus inexpensive to review them all, may be accepted. For instance, you may try a search that only has ten documents, which you could review in just a minute. You may just find one relevant, but it could be important. The acceptable range of number of documents to review in Bottom Line Driven Review will always take cost into consideration. That is where Step-Three comes in, Estimation. What will it costs to review the documents found?

Step Three: Estimates

It is not enough to come up with effective searches, which is the goal of Steps One and Two, the costs involved to review all of the documents returned with these searches must also be considered. It may still cost way too much to review the documents when considering the proportionality factors under 26(b)(1) as discussed in Part One of this article. The plan of review must always take the cost of review into consideration.

In Part One we described an estimation method that I like to use to calculate the cost of an ESI review. When the projected cost, the estimate, is proportional in your judgment (and, where appropriate, in the judge’s judgment), then you conclude your iterative process of refining searches. You can then move onto the next Step-Four of preparing your discovery plan and making disclosures of that plan.

Step Four: Plan, Disclosures

Once you have created effective searches that produce an affordable number of documents to review for production, you articulate the Plan and make some disclosures about your plan. The extent of transparency in this step can vary considerably, depending on the circumstances and people involved. Long talkers like me can go on about legal search for many hours, far past the boredom tolerance level of most non-specialists. You might be fascinated by the various searches I ran to come up with the say 12,472 documents for final review, but most opposing counsel do not care beyond making sure that certain pet keywords they may like were used and tested. You should be prepared to reveal that kind of work-product for purposes of dispute avoidance and to build good will. Typically they want you to review more documents, no matter what you say. They usually save their arguments for the bottom line, the costs. They usually argue for greater expense based on the first five criteria of Rule 26(b)(1):

  1. the importance of the issues at stake in this action;
  2. the amount in controversy;
  3. the parties’ relative access to relevant information;
  4. the parties’ resources;
  5. the importance of the discovery in resolving the issues; and
  6. whether the burden or expense of the proposed discovery outweighs its likely benefit.

Still, although early agreement on scope of review is often impossible, as the requesting party always wants you to spend more, you can usually move past this initial disagreement by agreeing to phased discovery. The requesting party can reserve its objections to your plan, but still agree it is adequate for phase one. Usually we find that after that phase one production is completed the requesting party’s demands for more are either eliminated or considerably tempered. It may well now to possible to reach a reasonable final agreement.

Step Five: Final Review

Here is where you start to carry out your discovery plan. In this stage you finish looking at the documents and coding them for Responsiveness (relevant), Irrelevant (not responsive), Privileged (relevant but privileged, and so logged and withheld) and Confidential (all levels, from just notations and legends, to redactions, to withhold and log. A fifth temporary document code is used for communication purposes throughout a project: Undetermined. Issue tagging is usually a waste of time and should be avoided. Instead, you should rely on search to find documents to support various points. There are typically only a dozen or so documents of importance at trial anyway, no matter what the original corpus size.

 

I highly recommend use of professional document review attorneys to assist you in this step. The so-called “contract lawyers” specialize in electronic document review and do so at a very low cost, typically in the neighborhood of $50 per hour.  The best of them, who may often command slightly higher rates, are speed readers with high comprehension. They also know what to look for in different kinds of cases. Some have impressive backgrounds. Of course, good management of these resources is required. They should have their own management and team leaders. Outside attorneys signing Rule 26(g) will also need to supervise them carefully, especially as to relevance intricacies. The day will come when a court will find it unreasonable not to employ these attorneys in a document review. The savings is dramatic and this in turn increases the persuasiveness of your cost burden argument.

Step Six: Production

The last step is transfer of the appropriate information to the requesting party and designated members of your team. Production is typically followed by later delivery of a Log of all documents withheld, even though responsive or relevant. The withheld logged documents are typically: Attorney-Client Communications protected from disclosure under the client’s privilege; or, Attorney Work-Product documents protected from disclosure under the attorney’s privilege. Two different privileges. The attorney’s work-product privilege is frequently waived in some part, although often very small. The client’s communications with its attorneys is, however, an inviolate privilege that is never waived.

Typically you should produce in stages and not wait until project completion. The only exception might be where the requesting party would rather wait and receive one big production instead of a series of small productions. That is very rare. So plan on multiple productions. We suggest the first production be small and serve as a test of the receiving party’s abilities and otherwise get the bugs out of the system.

Conclusion

In this essay I have shown the method I use in document reviews to control costs by use of estimation and multimodal search. I call this a Bottom Line Driven approach. The six step process is designed to help uncover the costs of review as part of the review itself. This kind of experienced based estimate is an ideal way to meet the evidentiary burdens of a proportionality objection under revised Rules 26(b)(1) and 32(b)(2). It provides the hard facts needed to be specific as to what you will review and what you will not and the likely costs involved.

The six-step approach described here uses the costs incurred at the front end of the project to predict the total expense. The costs are controlled by use of best practices, such as contract review lawyers, but primarily by limiting the number of documents reviewed. Although it is somewhat easier to follow this approach using predictive coding and document ranking, it can still be done without that search feature. You can try this approach using any review software. It works well in small or medium sized projects with fairly simple issues. For large complex projects we still recommend using the eight-step predictive coding approach as taught in the TarCourse.com.


Document Review and Proportionality – Part One

March 18, 2018

In 2013 I wrote a law review article on how the costs of document review could be controlled using predictive coding and cost estimation. Predictive Coding and the Proportionality Doctrine: a Marriage Made in Big Data, 26 Regent U. Law Review 1 (2013-2014). Today I write on how it can be controlled in document review, even without predictive coding. Here is the opening paragraph of my earlier article:

The search of electronic data to try to find evidence for use at trial has always been difficult and expensive. Over the past few years, the advent of Big Data, where both individuals and organizations retain vast amounts of complex electronic information, has significantly compounded these problems. The legal doctrine of proportionality responds to these problems by attempting to constrain the costs and burdens of discovery to what are reasonable. A balance is sought between the projected burdens and likely benefits of proposed discovery, considering the issues and value of the case. Several software programs on the market today have responded to the challenges of Big Data by implementing a form of artificial intelligence (“AI”) known as active machine learning to help lawyers review electronic documents. This Article discusses these issues and shows that AI-enhanced document review directly supports the doctrine of proportionality. When used together, proportionality and predictive coding provide a viable, long-term solution to the problems and opportunities of the legal search of Big Data.

The 2013 article was based on version 1.0 Predictive Coding. Under this first method you train and rank documents and then review only the higher ranking documents. Here is a more detailed description from pages 23, 24 of the article:

This kind of AI-enhanced legal review is typically described today in legal literature by the term
predictive coding. This is because the computer predicts how an entire body of documents should be coded (classified) based on how the lawyer has coded the smaller training sets. The prediction places a probability ranking on each document, typically ranging from 0% to 100% probability. Thus, in a
relevancy classification, each and every document in the entire dataset (the corpus) is ranked with a percentage of likely relevance and irrelevance. …
As will be shown, this ranking feature is key to the use of the legal doctrine of proportionality. The ability to rank all documents in a corpus on probable relevance is a new feature that no other legal search software has previously provided.71

It was a two phase procedure: train then review. Yes, some review would take place in the first training phase, but this would be a relatively small number, say 10-20% of the total documents reviewed. Most of the human review of documents would take place in phase two. The workflow of version 1.0 is shown in the diagram below and is described in detail in the article, starting at page 31.

Predictive Coding and the Proportionality Doctrine argued that attorneys should scale the number of documents for the second phase of document review based on estimated costs constrained to a proportional amount. No more spending $100,000 for document review in a $200,000 case. The number of documents you selected for review would be limited to proportional costs. Predictive coding and its ranking features allowed you to select the documents for review that were most likely to be relevant. If you could only afford to spend $20,000 on a document review project, then you would limit the number of documents reviewed to those within that scope that were the highest ranked as probable relevant. Here is the article’s description at pages 54-55 of the process and link between the doctrine of proportionality and predictive coding.

What makes this a marriage truly made in heaven is the document-ranking capabilities of predictive coding. This allows parties to limit the documents considered for final production to those that the computer determines have the highest probative value. This key ranking feature of AI-enhanced document review allows the producing party to provide the requesting party with the most bang for the buck. This not only saves the producing party money, and thus keeps its costs proportional, but it saves time and expenses for the requesting party. It makes the production much more precise, and thus faster and easier to review. It avoids what can be a costly exercise to a requesting party to wade through a document dump 192, a production that contains a high number of irrelevant or marginally relevant documents. Most importantly, it gives the requesting party what it really wants—the documents that are the most important to the case.

In the article, pages 58-60, I called this method Bottom-Line-Driven Proportional Review and describe the process in greater detail.

The bottom line in e-discovery production is what it costs. Despite what some lawyers and vendors may say, total cost is not an impossible question to answer. It takes an experienced lawyer’s skill to answer, but,
after a while, you can get quite good at such estimation. It is basically a matter of estimating attorney billable hours plus vendor costs. With practice, cost estimation can become a reliable art, a projection that you can count on for budgeting purposes, and, as we will see, for proportionality arguments.  …
The new strategy and methodology is based on a bottom line approach where you estimate what review costs will be, make a proportionality analysis as to what should be spent, and then engage in defensible culling to bring the review costs within the proportional budget. The producing party determines the number of documents to be subjected to final review by calculating backwards from the bottom line of what they are willing, or required, to pay for the production.  …
Under the Bottom-Line-Driven Proportional approach, after analyzing the case merits and determining the maximum proportional expense, the responding party makes a good faith estimate of the likely
maximum number of documents that can be reviewed within that budget. The document count represents the number of documents that you estimate can be reviewed for final decisions of relevance, confidentiality, privilege, and other issues and still remain within budget. The review costs you estimate must be based on best practices, which in all large review projects today means predictive coding, and the estimates must be accurate (i.e., no puffing or mere guesswork).
Note this last quote (emphasis added) from Predictive Coding and the Proportionality Doctrine: a Marriage Made in Big Data shows an important limitation to the article’s budgetary proposal, it was limited to large review projects where predictive coding was used. Without this marriage to predictive coding, the promise of proportionality by cost estimations was lost. My article today fills this gap.
Here I will explain how document review can be structured to provide estimates and review constraints, even when predictive coding and its ranking are not used. This is, in effect, the single lawyers guide, one where there has not been a marriage with predictive coding. It is a guide for small and medium sized document review projects, which are, after all, the vast majority of projects faced by the legal profession.

To be honest, back when I first wrote the law review article I did not think it would be necessary to develop such a proportionality method, one that does not use AI document ranking. I assumed predictive coding would take off and by now would be used in almost all projects, no matter what the size. I assumed that since active machine learning and document ranking was such good new technology, that even our conservative profession would embrace it within the next few years. Boy was I wrong about that. The closing lines of Predictive Coding and the Proportionality Doctrine: a Marriage Made in Big Data have been proven naive.

The key facts needed to try a case and to do justice can be found in any size case, big and small, at an affordable price, but you have to embrace change and adopt new legal and technical methodologies. The Bottom-Line-Driven Proportional Review method is part of that answer, and so too is advanced-review software at affordable prices. When the two are used together, it is a marriage made in heaven.

I blame both lawyers and e-discovery vendors for this failure, as well as myself for misjudging my peers. Law schools and corporate counsel have not helped much either. Only the judiciary seems to have caught on and kept up.

Proportionality as a legal doctrine took off as expected after 2013, but not the marriage with predictive coding. Lawyers have proven to be much more stubborn than anticipated. They will barely even go out with predictive coding, no matter how attractive she is, much less marry her. The profession as a whole remains remarkably slow to adopt new technology. The judges are tempted to use their shotgun to force a wedding, but so far have refrained from ordering a party to use predictive coding. Hyles v. New York City, No. 10 Civ. 3119 (AT)(AJP), 2016 WL 4077114 (S.D.N.Y. Aug. 1, 2016) (J. Peck: “There may come a time when TAR is so widely used that it might be unreasonable for a party to decline to use TAR. We are not there yet.”)

Changes Since 2013

A lot has happened since 2013 when Predictive Coding and the Proportionality Doctrine was written. In December 2015 Rule 26(b) on relevance was revised to strengthen proportionality and we have made substantial improvements to Predictive Coding methods. In the ensuing years most experts have abandoned this early two-step method of train then review in favor of a method where training continues throughout the review process. In other words, today we keep training until the end. See Eg. the e-Discovery Team’s Predictive Coding, version 4.0, with its Intelligently Spaced Training. (This is similar to a method popularized by Maura Grossman and Gordon Cormack, which they called Continuous Active Learning or CAL for short, a term they later trademarked.)

The 2015 revision to Rule 26(b) on relevance has spurred case law and clarified that undue burden, the sixth factor of proportionality under Rule 26(b)(1), must be argued in detail with facts proven.

  1. the importance of the issues at stake in this action;
  2. the amount in controversy;
  3. the parties’ relative access to relevant information;
  4. the parties’ resources;
  5. the importance of the discovery in resolving the issues; and
  6. whether the burden or expense of the proposed discovery outweighs its likely benefit.”

Oxbow Carbon & Minerals LLC v. Union Pacific Railroad Company, No. 11-cv-1049 (PLF/GMH), 2017 WL 4011136, (D.D.C. Sept. 11, 2017). Although all factors are important and should be addressed, the last factor is usually the most important one in a discovery dispute. It is also the factor that can be addressed generally for all cases and is the core of proportionality.

Proportional “Bottom Line Driven” Method of Document Review that Does Not Require Use of Predictive Coding

I have shared how I use predictive coding with continuous training in my TARcourse.com online instruction program. The eight-step workflow is shown below.

I have not previously shared any information on the document review workflow that I follow in small and medium seized cases where predictive coding is not used. The rest of this article will do so now.

Please note that I have a well-developed and articulated list of steps and procedures for attorneys in my law firm to follow in such small cases. I keep this as a trade-secret and will not reveal them here. Although they are widely known in my firm, and slightly revised and updated each year, they are not public. Still, any expert in document review should be able to create their own particular rules and implementation methods. Warning, if you are not such an expert, be careful in relying on these high-level explanations alone. The devil is in the details and you should retain an expert to assist.

Here is a chart summarizing the SIX-Step Workflow and six basic concepts that must be understood for the process to work at maximum efficiency.

The first three steps iterate with searches to cull out the irrelevant documents, and then culminate with Disclosures of the plan developed for Steps Five and Six, Final Review and Production.  The sixth production step is always in phases according to proportional planning.

A key skill that must be learned is project cost estimation, including fees and expenses. The attorneys involved must also learn how to communicate with themselves, the vendors, opposing counsel and the court. Rigid enforcement of work-product confidentiality is counter-productive to the goal of cost efficient projects. Agree on the small stuff and save your arguments for the cost-saving questions that are worth the effort.

 

The Proportionality Doctrine

The doctrine of proportionality as a legal initiative was launched by The Sedona Conference in 2010 as a reaction to the exploding costs of e-discovery. The Sedona Conference, The Sedona Conference Commentary on Proportionality in Electronic Discovery, 11 SEDONA CONF. J. 289, 292–94 (2010). See also John L. Carroll, Proportionality in Discovery: A Cautionary Tale, 32 CAMPBELL L. REV. 455, 460 (2010) (“If courts and litigants approach discovery with the mindset of proportionality, there is the potential for real savings in both dollars and time to resolution.”); Maura Grossman & Gordon Cormack, Some Thoughts on Incentives, Rules, and Ethics Concerning the Use of Search Technology in E-Discovery, 12 SEDONA CONF. J. 89, 94–95, 101–02 (2011).

The doctrine received a big boost with the adoption of the 2015 Amendment to Rule 26. The rule was changed to provide discovery must be both relevant and “proportional to the needs of the case.” Fed. R. Civ. P. 26(b)(1). To determine whether a discovery request is proportional, you are required weigh the following six factors: “(1) the importance of the issues at stake in this action; (2) the amount in controversy; (3) the parties’ relative access to relevant information; (4) the parties’ resources; (5) the importance of the discovery in resolving the issues; and (6) whether the burden or expense of the proposed discovery outweighs its likely benefit.” Williams v. BASF Catalysts, LLC, Civ. Action No. 11-1754, 2017 WL 3317295, at *4 (D.N.J. Aug. 3, 2017) (citing Fed. R. Civ. P. 26(b)(1)); Arrow Enter. Computing Solutions, Inc. v. BlueAlly, LLC, No. 5:15-CV-37-FL, 2017 WL 876266, at *4 (E.D.N.C. Mar. 3, 2017); FTC v. Staples, Inc., Civ. Action No. 15-2115 (EGS), 2016 WL 4194045, at *2 (D.D.C. Feb. 26, 2016).

“[N]o single factor is designed to outweigh the other factors in determining whether the discovery sought is proportional,” and all proportionality determinations must be made on a case-by-case basis. Williams, 2017 WL 3317295, at *4 (internal citations omitted); see also Bell v. Reading Hosp., Civ. Action No. 13-5927, 2016 WL 162991, at *2 (E.D. Pa. Jan. 14, 2016). To be sure, however, “the amendments to Rule 26(b) do not alter the basic allocation of the burden on the party resisting discovery to—in order to successfully resist a motion to compel—specifically object and show that . . . a discovery request would impose an undue burden or expense or is otherwise objectionable.” Mir v. L-3 Commc’ns Integrated Sys., L.P., 319 F.R.D. 220, 226 (N.D. Tex. 2016), as quoted by Oxbow Carbon & Minerals LLC v. Union Pacific Railroad Company, No. 11-cv-1049 (PLF/GMH), 2017 WL 4011136, (D.D.C. Sept. 11, 2017).

The Oxbow case is discussed at length in my recent blog Judge Facciola’s Successor, Judge Michael Harvey, Provides Excellent Proportionality Analysis in an Order to Compel (e-Discovery Team,3/1/18). Judge Harvey carefully examined the costs and burdens claimed by plaintiffs and rejected the overly burdensome argument.

Plaintiffs’ counsel explained at the second hearing in this matter that Oxbow has spent $1.391 million to date on reviewing and producing approximately 584,000 documents from its nineteen other custodians and Oxbow’s email archive. See 8/24/17 TR. at 44:22-45:10. And again, Oxbow seeks tens of millions of dollars from Defendants. Through that lens, the estimated cost of reviewing and producing Koch’s responsive documents—even considering the total approximate cost of $142,000 for that effort, which includes the expense of the sampling effort—while certainly high, is not so unreasonably high as to warrant rejecting Defendants’ request out of hand. See Zubulake v. UBS Warburg, LLC, 217 F.R.D. 309, 321 (S.D.N.Y. 2003) (explaining, in the context of a cost-shifting request, that “[a] response to a discovery request costing $100,000 sounds (and is) costly, but in a case potentially worth millions of dollars, the cost of responding may not be unduly burdensome”); Xpedior Creditor Trust v. Credit Suisse First Boston (USA), Inc., 309 F. Supp. 2d 459, 466 (S.D.N.Y. 2003) (finding no “undue burden or expense” to justify cost-shifting where the requested discovery cost approximately $400,000 but the litigation involved at least $68.7 million in damages). …

In light of the above analysis—including the undersigned’s assessment of each of the Rule 26 proportionality factors, all of which weigh in favor of granting Defendants’ motion—the Court is unwilling to find that the burden of reviewing the remaining 65,000 responsive documents for a fraction of the cost of discovery to date should preclude Defendants’ proposed request. See BlueAlly, 2017 WL 876266, at *5 (“This [last Rule 26] factor may combine all the previous factors into a final analysis of burdens versus benefits.” (citing Fed. R. Civ. P. 26 advisory committee’s notes)).

For more analysis and case law on proportionality see Proportionality Φ and Making It Easy To Play “e-Discovery: Small, Medium or Large?” in Your Own Group or Class, (e-Discovery Team, 11/26/17). Also see The Sedona Conference Commentary on Proportionality, May 2017.

Learning How to Estimate Document Review Costs

The best way to determine a total cost of a project is by projection from experience and analysis on a cost per file basis. General experience of review costs can be very helpful, but the gold standard comes from measurement of costs actually incurred in the same project, usually after several hours of work, or days, depending on the size of the project. You calculate costs incurred to date and then project forward on a cost per file basis.  The is the core idea of the Six Step document review protocol that this article begins to explain.

The actual project costs are the best possible metrics for estimation. Apparently that was never done in Oxbow because the plaintiffs counsel’s projected document review cost estimates varied so much. A per file cost analysis of the information in the Oxbow opinion shows that the parties missed a key metric. The costs projected ranged from an actual cost of $2.38 per file for the first 584,000 files, to an 1.17 per file estimate to review 214,000 additional files, to an estimate of $1.73 per file to review 82,000 more files, to an actual cost of $4.74 per file to review 12,074 files, to final estimate of $1.22 per file to review the remaining 69,926 files. The actual costs are way higher than the estimated costs meaning the moving party cheated themselves by failing to do the math.

Here is how I explained the estimation process in Predictive Coding and the Proportionality Doctrine at pages 60-61:

Under the Bottom-Line-Driven Proportional approach, after analyzing the case merits and determining the maximum proportional expense, the responding party makes a good faith estimate of the likely maximum number of documents that can be reviewed within that budget. The document count represents the number of documents that you estimate can be reviewed for final decisions of relevance, confidentiality, privilege, and other issues and still remain within budget.
A few examples may help clarify how this method works. Assume a case where you determine a proportional cost of production to be $50,000, and estimate, based on sampling and other hard facts, that it will cost you $1.25 per file for both the automated and manual review before production of the ESI at issue … Then you can review no more than 40,000 documents and stay within budget. It is that simple. No higher math is required.

Estimation for bottom-line-driven review is essentially a method for marshaling evidence to support an undue burden argument under Rule 26(b)(1). Let’s run through it again with greater detail and make a simple formula to illustrate the process.

First, estimate the total number of documents remaining to be reviewed after culling by your tested keywords and other searches (hereinafter “T”). This is the most difficult step but is something most attorney experts and vendors are well qualified to help you with. Essentially “T” represents is the number of documents left unreviewed for Step Five, Final Review.  These are the documents found in Steps One and Two, ECA Multimodal Search and Testing. These steps, along with the estimate calculation, usually repeat several times to cull-in the documents that are most likely relevant to the claims and defenses. The T – Total Documents Left for Review – are the documents in the final revised keyword search folders and concept, similarity search folders. The goal is to obtain a relevance precision in these folders greater than 50%, preferably at least 75%.

To begin an example hypothetical, assume that the total document count in the folders set-up for final review is 5,000 documents. T=5,000. Next count how many relevant and highly relevant files have already been located (hereinafter “R”).  Assume for our example that 1,000 relevant and highly relevant documents have been found. R=1,000.

Next, look up the total attorney fees already incurred in the matter to date for the actual document search and review work by attorneys and paralegals (hereinafter collectively “F”). Include the vendor charges in this total related to the review, but excluding forensics and collection fees. To do this more easily, make sure that the time descriptions that your legal team inputs are clear on what fees are for review. Always remember that you may be required to provide an affidavit or testimony someday to support this cost estimate in a motion for protective order. For our example assume that a total in $1,500 in costs and fees have already been incurred for document search and review work only. F=$1,500. The F divided by R creates the cost per file. Here it is $1.50 per file (F/R).

Finally, multiply the cost per file (F/R) by the number of documents still remaining to be reviewed, T. In other words T * (F/R).  Here that is 5,000 (T) times the $1.50 cost per file (F/R), which equals $7,500. You can then disclose this calculation to opposing counsel to help establish the reasonableness (proportionality) of your plan. Step Four – Work Product Disclosure. Note you are estimating a total spend here for this review project of $9,000; $1,500 already spent, plus an estimated additional $7,500 to complete the project.

There are many ways to calculate probable fees to complete document review project. This simple formula method has the advantage of being based on actual experience and costs incurred. It is also simple and easy to understand compared to most other methods. The method could be criticized for inflating expected costs by observing that the work initially performed to find relevant documents is usually slower and more expensive than concluding work to review the tested search folders. This is generally true, but is countered by the fact that: (1) many of the initial relevant documents found in ECA (Step-One) were “low hanging fruit” and easier to locate than what remains; (2) the precision rate of the documents remaining to be reviewed after culling – T – will be much higher than the document folders previously reviewed (the higher the precision rate, the slower the rate of review, because it takes longer to code a relevant document than an irrelevant document); and, (3) additional time is necessarily incurred in the remaining review for redaction, privilege analysis, and quality control efforts not performed in the review to date.

To be concluded …  In the conclusion of this article I will review the Six Steps and complete discussion of the related concepts.



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